From Reason.com

  • D.C.'s Metro Wants to Win Back Young Riders With DVD Rentals, Photo Booths in Stations

    The kids don't think transit is cool anymore. That's the stunning conclusion reached by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA)—the agency responsible for running the Washington, D.C.-area's troubled Metro rail service—at its board meeting this past Friday.

    It is of course no secret that Metro has been hemorrhaging riders in recent years, thanks to a mix of service cutbacks, station closures, and the occasional fire. This fall in users has been most pronounced among younger...


  • DNA Evidence Exonerates a Man Who Spent 19 Years in Prison for the Death of His Lover

    In April 1998, Terry Cheek's strangled body was found near Corona Lake in California's Temescal Valley. Cheek left behind a husband, two children, and Horace Roberts, her extramarital lover and co-worker. Riverside County prosecutors said a watch belonging to Roberts was found near her body. It was largely on this piece of evidence that prosecutors sent Roberts away to prison for second-degree murder in 1999. Now, nearly 20 years later, the 60-year-old is the latest American to show that it is...


  • Maryland Cop Accused of Raping Undocumented Immigrant at Traffic Stop

    A Maryland police officer is facing multiple criminal charges after he allegedly raped a woman during a traffic stop last week. The alleged victim is reportedly an undocumented immigrant.

    Officer 1st Class Ryan Macklin was assigned to the Prince George's County Police Department Bureau of Patrol prior to his arrest late yesterday, according to a department press release. Macklin, a six-year veteran of the department, has since been arrested and suspended without pay. "He is no longer a police...


  • TSA Puts the Squeeze on Working Mom

    As a working mother of two, Heather Gieseke has flown enough to know the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) guidelines for traveling with breast milk. She always follows those rules and never had any major issues until Thursday, when TSA agents wouldn't let her take a day's worth of milk through security.

    Gieseke, whose youngest daughter is just 2 and a half months old, left her milk behind, but only because she felt she didn't have any other choice. "In the moment, I felt very...


  • Trump Seems More Skeptical of Elizabeth Warren's Ancestry Test Than of Saudi Innocence in Death of Jamal Khashoggi: Reason Roundup

    "There's not enough money in the world for us to buy back our credibility on human rights," chastises Rubio. Authorities have admitted that maybe U.S.-based Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was killed while paying a visit to the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, and have promised to put out a statement soon with more information about the death of a man routinely critical of his country's leadership and policies. To President Trump, this seems neither a cause for alarm nor a rethinking of America's...


  • Losing the Property Rights Lottery

    Donald and Irma Shirkey tried to play by the rules, but Pacific Grove, California, turned their property rights into a game of chance.

    The couple purchased their brightly painted house on 5th Street, just a block from the ocean, in 1999. It was a second home for family and friends to use on visits. To cover the cost, the Shirkeys decided also to rent the house out as a vacation home. When Pacific Grove passed a new ordinance in 2010 requiring all short-term rental homes in the city to be...


  • Brickbat: And No Pineapple

    The British government is set to impose limits on calories in ready-to-eat meals and sandwiches sold in restaurants and supermarkets. And the limits will be well below the number of calories typically in those foods now. A small pizza, for instance, could have no more than 928 calories, which would force makers to either cut the size of the pizza or reduce the amount of toppings.


  • Facebook Slams Independent Voices With Latest Political Purge

    If Facebook is concerned about a growing chorus of accusations that the social media giant suppresses some voices and elevates others in accord with the company's prevailing political biases, that's not obvious in the firm's latest purge of political pages and accounts.

    On Thursday, October 11, Nathaniel Gleicher, Facebook's Head of Cybersecurity Policy and Oscar Rodriguez, Product Manager, announced the company was shutting down 559 pages and 251 accounts "created to stir up political debate."...


  • It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's … Doug?

    Today we interview Doug, the chief legal officer of GCHQ, the British equivalent of NSA. It's the first time we've interviewed someone whose full identify is classified. Out of millions of possible pseudonyms, he's sticking with "Doug." Listen in as he explains why. More seriously, Doug covers the now-considerable oversight regime that governs GCHQ's intercepts and other intelligence collection, Britain's view of how the law of war applies in cyberspace, the prospects for UN talks on that topic,...


  • Drug Companies, Scared of Regulation, Inch Toward Price Transparency

    Hoping to preempt regulatory efforts to mandate drug price disclosures, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) announced today new voluntary direct-to-consumer advertising principles.

    Specifically, all DTC television advertising by drug companies "that identifies a prescription medicine by name should include direction as to where patients can find information about the cost of the medicine, such as a company-developed website, including the list price and average,...


  • Patch Publishes Completely Unnecessary Sex Offender Maps to Keep Kids Safe on Halloween

    Every year around Halloween time, Patch, the news website specializing in local coverage around the country, publishes maps that show where sex offenders live. Patch claims this is some kind of public service, even though a thorough study of 67,000 cases of child molestation found zero increase in sex crimes against children on Halloween.

    The vast majority of crimes against children are not committed by strangers, but by people close to the kids. Stranger danger is actually pointing worried...


  • It's Official: 2018 Federal Deficit Largest Since 2012

    The federal government finished the 2018 fiscal year—it ended on September 30—a whopping $779 billion in the red, the largest annual budget deficit since 2012.

    The current fiscal year is likely to see an even larger deficit, potentially in excess of $1 trillion.

    The Treasury Department's final data for the 2018 fiscal year, released Monday, shows that the deficit was driven by a combination of higher spending and additional borrowing. The latter was necessary to finance the former, of course,...