From Smashing Magazine

  • Sharing Code Between Projects: Lessons Learned In The Trenches

    About a year ago, we came to a crossroad that changed the way we build software today. Like many other teams, we were working on a few things at a time, developing different projects for our web and mobile applications, with shared ingredients in the form of common Node.js code between our back-end repositoriess and microservices, and common React UI components with some slight visual and functional differences between our apps.


  • Working Together: How Designers And Developers Can Communicate To Create Better Projects

    Among the most popular suggestions on Smashing Magazine’s Content User Suggestions board is the need of learning more about the interaction and communication between designers and developers. There are probably several articles worth of very specific things that could be covered here, but I thought I would kick things off with a general post rounding up some experiences on the subject.

    Given the wide range of skills held by the line-up at our upcoming SmashingConf Toronto — a fully live,...


  • On Failures And Successes: Meet SmashingConf Freiburg 2018

    Everybody loves speaking about successes, but nobody can succeed without failing big time along the way. It’s through mistakes that we grow and get smarter. So for the upcoming SmashingConf Freiburg 2018 (Sept. 10–11), we want to put these stories into focus for a change and explore practical techniques and strategies learned in real projects — the hard way. Aarron Walter, Josh Clark, Tammy Everts, Morten Rand-Hendriksen & many others. Sept 10–11.


  • Redesigning A Digital Interior Design Shop (A Case Study)

    Good products are the result of a continual effort in research and design. And, as it usually turns out, our designs don’t solve the problems they were meant to right away. It’s always about constant improvement and iteration.

    I have a client called Design Cafe (let’s call it DC). It’s an innovative interior design shop founded by a couple of very talented architects. They produce bespoke designs for the Indian market and sell them online.


  • What You Need To Know To Increase Mobile Checkout Conversions

    Google’s mobile-first indexing is here. Well, for some websites anyway. For the rest of us, it will be here soon enough, and our websites need to be in tip-top shape if we don’t want search rankings to be adversely affected by the change.

    That said, responsive web design is nothing new. We’ve been creating custom mobile user experiences for years now, so most of our websites should be well poised to take this on… right?


  • Advanced CSS Layouts With Flexbox and CSS Grid

    Full-day workshop • April 19th

    This workshop is designed for designers and developers who already have a good working knowledge of HTML and CSS. We will cover a range of CSS methods for achieving layout, from those you are safe to use right now even if you need to support older version of Internet Explorer through to things that while still classed as experimental, are likely to ship in browsers in the coming months.


  • How To Create An Audio/Video Recording App With React Native: An In-Depth Tutorial

    React Native is a young technology, already gaining popularity among developers. It is a great option for smooth, fast, and efficient mobile app development. High-performance rates for mobile environments, code reuse, and a strong community: These are just some of the benefits React Native provides.

    In this guide, I will share some insights about the high-level capabilities of React Native and the products you can develop with it in a short period of time.


  • New Front-End Adventures in Responsive Design

    Full-day workshop — April 19th With HTTP/2, Service Workers, Responsive Images, Flexbox, CSS Grid, SVG, WAI-ARIA roles and Font Loading API now available in browsers, we all are still trying to figure out just the right strategy for designing and buildings responsive websites efficiently. We want to use all of these technologies and smart processes like atomic design, but how can we use them efficiently, and how do we achieve it within a reasonable amount of time?


  • Graphic Design Crashcourse

    Full-day workshop • April 19th In this workshop, Mark Boulton will guide you through the practical design techniques that make a difference. From learning how to crop a photograph to guide a viewers eyes, to being able to typeset a data table for optimum scanning by a reader. This is a very practical workshop. You’ll end the day with a design you are proud of and a new toolbox of design techniques to use tomorrow.


  • Design for What’s Next

    Full-day workshop • April 19th Spend a day exploring the web’s emerging interactions and how you can put them to work today. Your guide is designer Josh Clark, author of Designing for Touch and ambassador of the near future.

    The day begins with a survey of familiar platforms—desktop and mobile—to uncover the new solutions that are replacing yesterday’s best practices. From there, we’ll move into newer design tools—speech, bots, physical interfaces, artificial intelligence, and more—to see how...


  • Which Podcasts Should Web Designers And Developers Be Listening To?

    We asked the Smashing community what podcasts they listened to, aiming to compile a shortlist of current podcasts for web designers and developers. We had what can only be called a very strong response — both in number and in passion.

    First, we winnowed out the podcasts that were on a broader theme (e.g. creativity, mentoring, leadership), on a narrower theme (e.g. on one specific WordPress theme) or on a completely different theme (e.


  • How To Improve Your Design Process With Data-Based Personas

    Most design and product teams have some type of persona document. Theoretically, personas help us better understand our users and meet their needs. The idea is that codifying what we’ve learned about distinct groups of users helps us make better design decisions. Referring to these documents ourselves and sharing them with non-design team members and external stakeholders should ultimately lead to a user experience more closely aligned with what real users actually need.