New F-21 Fighter Could Be Amazing (Take an F-16 and Add F-22 and F-35 Tech)
The National Interest -

David Axe

Security,

At least we think so. 

The three F-35 "variants" share very few design elements outside of their cockpits. Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan, then the head of the F-35 program office, in 2016 told a seminar audience that the F-35 models are only 20- to 25-percent common.

Lockheed Martin in mid-February 2019 offered to sell India a new fighter the company calls the "F-21."

(This first appeared several months ago.)

Only it doesn't look like a new fighter at all. The F-21 looks...


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