Old F-35s Are About to Become the Ultimate Enemy for the U.S. Air Force
The National Interest -

David Axe

Security,

If you want to beat stealth, you need to fight stealth. 

The U.S. Air Force is preparing Nellis Air Force base in Nevada to host an aggressor squadron flying F-35 stealth fighters.

The U.S. Air Force in May 2019 announced it would re-establish a defunct squadron that flew F-15s to simulate the enemy force in realistic war games. The service in 2014 shuttered the 65th Aggressor Squadron as a cost-saving measure.

The 65th Aggressor Squadron in its new form would operate nine...


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